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Offline Anya77  
#1 Posted : Wednesday, May 09, 2012 2:19:58 PM(UTC)
Rank: Member

Joined: 10/19/2008(UTC)
Posts: 314
Location: West Coast
Because of my job (Dental Hygienist) I thought I would raise some awareness about periodontal disease. I just wanted to let everyone know how crucial it is for you to take care of your gums. I see 8 people a day and of those approximately 50% have periodontal disease. (the disease that causes permanent jawbone destruction) I see it in the very young often (18 - 23) This is not just mature adult affliction. If one or both or your parents lost their teeth at an early age (under 60) there's a STRONG possibility that they had advanced periodontal disease. There's is also a GREATER risk that you have inherited their condition.

^^^This doesn't automatically mean that you will get periodontal disease

If one of your parents had this condition and you SMOKE there's a HUGE possibility (90%) you will get periodontal disease as well.

Sometimes people do everything right and still end up getting periodontal disease, here are some reasons:

You have been seeing a dentist/hygienist who doesn't take gum measurements at least once a year

You are seeing a dentist/ hygienist that doesn't tell you that BLEEDING during a routine cleaning is a sign of a bacterial gum infection (gingivitis and possible periodontitis) and is not normal.

You take great care of your teeth but your spouse, partner or significant other doesn't, therefore every time you kiss you are swapping their (disease causing bacteria) for yours. Yes, your partner can PASS you their gum disease.

Please feel free to ask me questions.

Edited by user Wednesday, May 09, 2012 5:21:13 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

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Offline Larazelle  
#2 Posted : Wednesday, May 09, 2012 5:18:32 PM(UTC)
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/12/2008(UTC)
Posts: 2,369
Anya77 wrote:
Because of my job (Dental Hygienist) I thought I would raise some awareness about periodontal disease. I just wanted to let everyone know how crucial it is for you to take care of your gums. I see 8 people a day and of those approximately 50% have periodontal disease. (the disease that causes permanent jawbone destruction) I see it in the very young often (18 - 23) This is not just mature adult affliction. If one or both or your parents lost their teeth at an early age (under 60) there's a STRONG possibility that they had advanced periodontal disease. There's is also a GREATER risk that you have inherited their condition.

^^^This doesn't automatically mean that you will get periodontal disease

If one of your parents had this condition and you SMOKE there's a HUGE possibility (90%) you will get periodontal disease as well.

Sometimes people do everything right and still end up getting periodontal disease, here are some reasons:

You have been seeing a dentist/hygienist who doesn't take gum measurements at least once a year

You are seeing a dentist/ hygienist that doesn't tell you that BLEEDING during a routine cleaning is a sign of a bacterial gum infection (gingivitis and possible periodontitis) and is not normal.

You take great care of your teeth but your spouse, partner or significant other doesn't, therefore every time you kiss you are swapping their disease causing bacteria for yours. Yes your partner can PASS you their gum disease.

Please feel free to ask me questions.




Thanks Anya -

This is very timely info as I have a cleaning scheduled for Monday of next week - My hygienist is quite thorough - she does measure my gums - however I sometimes do bleed and no one has said anything - so I will ask her if that happens again -
Offline saveface  
#3 Posted : Wednesday, May 09, 2012 5:50:03 PM(UTC)
Rank: Member

Joined: 9/22/2009(UTC)
Posts: 426
Hi Anya,

I've been reading about diabetes lately, and I have question for you. Would you say that most of your diabetic patients have periodontal disease? One of the books I read said that high blood sugar promotes inflammation of the gums, and that chronic inflammation of the gums also contributes to high blood sugar. So it's kind of a vicious circle, where if you don't coordinate the periodontal treatment with proper diet/exercise/diabetes meds, then you can never really get either of these problems (the diabetes and the periodontal disease) fully under control. Is that true in your experience?
Offline Aggie  
#4 Posted : Wednesday, May 09, 2012 6:03:44 PM(UTC)
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 12/29/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,132
Anya77 wrote:
Because of my job (Dental Hygienist) I thought I would raise some awareness about periodontal disease. I just wanted to let everyone know how crucial it is for you to take care of your gums. I see 8 people a day and of those approximately 50% have periodontal disease. (the disease that causes permanent jawbone destruction) I see it in the very young often (18 - 23) This is not just mature adult affliction. If one or both or your parents lost their teeth at an early age (under 60) there's a STRONG possibility that they had advanced periodontal disease. There's is also a GREATER risk that you have inherited their condition.

^^^This doesn't automatically mean that you will get periodontal disease

If one of your parents had this condition and you SMOKE there's a HUGE possibility (90%) you will get periodontal disease as well.

Sometimes people do everything right and still end up getting periodontal disease, here are some reasons:

You have been seeing a dentist/hygienist who doesn't take gum measurements at least once a year

You are seeing a dentist/ hygienist that doesn't tell you that BLEEDING during a routine cleaning is a sign of a bacterial gum infection (gingivitis and possible periodontitis) and is not normal.

You take great care of your teeth but your spouse, partner or significant other doesn't, therefore every time you kiss you are swapping their (disease causing bacteria) for yours. Yes, your partner can PASS you their gum disease.

Please feel free to ask me questions.



Wow. Thanks Anya. That's very good info ...

I go to the dentist regulary but he has never measured my gums. He is my cosmetic dentist. Maybe its time to change!

How do I know if I have it, besides the bleeding with routine cleaning (ah, yes)? And is it treatable.

Am off to floss and book a clean.


Offline Sue  
#5 Posted : Wednesday, May 09, 2012 11:13:34 PM(UTC)
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/23/2008(UTC)
Posts: 4,789
Woman
Thanks for the good advice, Anya :)

UserPostedImage
Offline DianaD  
#6 Posted : Thursday, May 10, 2012 12:40:54 AM(UTC)
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/1/2011(UTC)
Posts: 1,100
It's also important if you're going to be having surgery...
Offline CassVersion2.0  
#7 Posted : Thursday, May 10, 2012 1:22:52 AM(UTC)
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/5/2008(UTC)
Posts: 606
Great post Anya! Especially appropriate since we here are concerned with all matters of anti-aging.

I think gum health is one of THE most important things we can do in regards to anti-aging. Unhealthy gums are like an open window into the body for disease and bacteria. The inflammation from gum disease causes inflammation to the whole body. Bodies with inflammation cannot fight infection or heal very well. (Very important for those of us having surgery!) Lots of research showing connections between gum disease and heart disease, diabetes, stroke, etc. Also, tooth loss leads to jaw bone loss, which really ages the face. Not to mention the fact that tooth loss makes it hard to eat and get appropriate nutrition. That will age us even further.
Offline AnnieB  
#8 Posted : Thursday, May 10, 2012 3:33:53 AM(UTC)
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/23/2009(UTC)
Posts: 1,600
Thank you, Anya, for your post. Very interesting my doctor has never measured my gums either. I have an appt in June and am going to address that with him.
Offline rev3  
#9 Posted : Thursday, May 10, 2012 10:19:59 AM(UTC)
Rank: Member

Joined: 7/14/2008(UTC)
Posts: 672
Location: ny
bad gums kill

good reminder
Offline Bugjune  
#10 Posted : Thursday, May 10, 2012 12:33:30 PM(UTC)
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/29/2009(UTC)
Posts: 4,480
Woman
Location: The leaf I am sitting on
Anya, your post was timely for me, too, cuz I had my 6-mo cleaning that very day you posted! <:-(0)

I had slacked off a bit the past year, using dental floss sticks as they are much easier, but also the WaterPik, as well as brushing 4 times a day.

No good. Dentist still found I had bleeding gums in places and pocket measurements were worse than a year ago. I was BUMMED. I may have a nice looking smile, but the exam told me I have to go back to string floss and maybe do the perio tray treatment my dentist wanted me to do. I think that a pocket measurement over "2" is bad, right? I had mostly 3's, and even a couple 5's. <:-(

I had custom trays made to fit my teeth, and was to put a solution of 1.7% hydrogen peroxide in them FOUR TIMES A DAY for 20 minutes. I said, "Screw that!" The gel completely destroyed my taste buds!

But there has to be some compromise on my part, too. So I'm trying to do the trays once a day for 20 minutes, back to string floss, continue with the WaterPik and 4 brushings per day.

I think that women after menopause get the double-whammy. But I also take HRT and was hoping I'd get some protection from that?

Anyway, I second your sound advice. Dental health and gum condition is tip-top priority.
I bug you.

UserPostedImage
Offline Anya77  
#11 Posted : Thursday, May 10, 2012 1:02:22 PM(UTC)
Rank: Member

Joined: 10/19/2008(UTC)
Posts: 314
Location: West Coast
saveface wrote:
Hi Anya,

I've been reading about diabetes lately, and I have question for you. Would you say that most of your diabetic patients have periodontal disease? One of the books I read said that high blood sugar promotes inflammation of the gums, and that chronic inflammation of the gums also contributes to high blood sugar. So it's kind of a vicious circle, where if you don't coordinate the periodontal treatment with proper diet/exercise/diabetes meds, then you can never really get either of these problems (the diabetes and the periodontal disease) fully under control. Is that true in your experience?


Yes, that is dead on right! Every diabetes patient I have is periodontally involved. With diabetes you have to extra vigilant about your dental health; dental appt every 3 months if it were me.
Offline Anya77  
#12 Posted : Thursday, May 10, 2012 1:09:08 PM(UTC)
Rank: Member

Joined: 10/19/2008(UTC)
Posts: 314
Location: West Coast
Aggie wrote:


Wow. Thanks Anya. That's very good info ...

I go to the dentist regulary but he has never measured my gums. He is my cosmetic dentist. Maybe its time to change!

How do I know if I have it, besides the bleeding with routine cleaning (ah, yes)? And is it treatable.

Am off to floss and book a clean.




Most dentists these days are cosmetic dentists as there is a lot of money in it and doesn't require a specialist license. Every dentist whether calling himself cosmetic or general has the same standard of care. The standard of care is to not build implants, crowns, veneers bridges on diseased gums. Make them measure your gums! Ask them to "do your probe measurements" and read them aloud to you. If you hear 1-3 you're healthy. If you hear "4" in only a few areas you're ok but need to floss and brush those areas better. If you hear "5" and above you have gum disease; unless it is on a fully erupted wisdom tooth. In addition- If you bleed during brushing (you're using a soft bristled tooth brush/ electric right?) you may have perio disease.

Offline Anya77  
#13 Posted : Thursday, May 10, 2012 1:16:19 PM(UTC)
Rank: Member

Joined: 10/19/2008(UTC)
Posts: 314
Location: West Coast
Bugjune wrote:
Anya, your post was timely for me, too, cuz I had my 6-mo cleaning that very day you posted! <:-(0)

I had slacked off a bit the past year, using dental floss sticks as they are much easier, but also the WaterPik, as well as brushing 4 times a day.

No good. Dentist still found I had bleeding gums in places and pocket measurements were worse than a year ago. I was BUMMED. I may have a nice looking smile, but the exam told me I have to go back to string floss and maybe do the perio tray treatment my dentist wanted me to do. I think that a pocket measurement over "2" is bad, right? I had mostly 3's, and even a couple 5's. <:-(

I had custom trays made to fit my teeth, and was to put a solution of 1.7% hydrogen peroxide in them FOUR TIMES A DAY for 20 minutes. I said, "Screw that!" The gel completely destroyed my taste buds!

But there has to be some compromise on my part, too. So I'm trying to do the trays once a day for 20 minutes, back to string floss, continue with the WaterPik and 4 brushings per day.

I think that women after menopause get the double-whammy. But I also take HRT and was hoping I'd get some protection from that?

Anyway, I second your sound advice. Dental health and gum condition is tip-top priority.



Did your dentist see actual bone loss on your x-ray? just wondering if he mentioned that

With the measurements 1-3 is good, 4's in the posterior teeth(1-2 spots) is ok. Perhaps you should ask him if he can place Arestin in the areas that are 5's.

With the floss make sure you are not just popping in and out between each tooth, rather wrap the floss around one side of the tooth then the other side.

That's interesting about menopause; I'm not entirely sure if there's a connection, I will research.
Online MissJ  
#14 Posted : Thursday, May 10, 2012 1:26:33 PM(UTC)
Rank: Administration

Joined: 5/14/2008(UTC)
Posts: 23,696
rm from this board said she had receding gums but that was from her brushing them too much and their wearing away.

I use a product out of India called; 'VICCO' it's brown stuff made with a bunch of herbs that have astringent affect on gums and makes them stronger. It's not ADA approved stuff though. I also do an Indian technique called 'oil pulling'. It's when you use coconut or sesame oil and suck that through the teeth and swish for 20 min before brushing. The oil somehow latches on to the bio film and removes it. So, when I get my (remaining) teeth cleaned, they are amazed that there is never really any biofilm on them (plaque) but just stains between the teeth that I can't manage to remove.
Offline Anya77  
#15 Posted : Thursday, May 10, 2012 4:54:03 PM(UTC)
Rank: Member

Joined: 10/19/2008(UTC)
Posts: 314
Location: West Coast
MissJ wrote:
rm from this board said she had receding gums but that was from her brushing them too much and their wearing away.

I use a product out of India called; 'VICCO' it's brown stuff made with a bunch of herbs that have astringent affect on gums and makes them stronger. It's not ADA approved stuff though. I also do an Indian technique called 'oil pulling'. It's when you use coconut or sesame oil and suck that through the teeth and swish for 20 min before brushing. The oil somehow latches on to the bio film and removes it. So, when I get my (remaining) teeth cleaned, they are amazed that there is never really any biofilm on them (plaque) but just stains between the teeth that I can't manage to remove.



Receding gums can have many causes:

gum disease (big cause)

edge to edge bite (big cause)

brushing with a hard toothbrush in a horizontal direction

getting older (long in the tooth)

Miss J: remember there's also "bio film" under the gum which the oil will not help and which is much more harmful to the jawbone than the bio film that presents as plaque above the gum. I have also tried oil pulling so I know what you're talking about. Incidentally, I worked at a practice owned by an indian dentist last year; I worked on most of his friends and relatives. They had some of the most advanced cases of perio I have ever had to deal with, as well as very hard tenacious calculus (hardened plaque) deposits under their gums. Most of the elderly indian patients were almost completely edentulous. I guess what I'm getting at is Indian people are known for making the "most" of very little resources so I feel as though this oil-pulling is simply an attempt to solve a costly problem where people don't necessarily have the money to take care of their teeth properly. India is not a leading country in dental care, if anything indian dentists come to the US to study dentistry. Not meant in anyway to be derogatory to Indian people as they are leaders in other industries.
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